Marjorie – Her journey as a visually impaired person.

Marjorie is 87 years old and has been visually impaired for five years.

She struggled with her sight loss for quite some time and didn’t know who to ask for help.

She felt totally isolated and at the end of her tether.

She was finally referred to Barrow Blind Society and says from then on things moved very quickly.

Marjorie was given information on the various aids available to her in order to maintain her independence in her home. She was referred to the Low Vision Clinic where she was assessed and given appropriate magnification aids.

Social isolation can be a big factor for anybody who becomes visually impaired and as Vision Support officers, we try to encourage people to join our various groups. Marjorie is a member of our Grange group and has found talking to others with similar problems extremely important. Marjorie has also attended our Macular and Charles Bonnet Syndrome Support group and our Dual Sensory Loss group. Through these groups she has been able to gain valuable information about both her visual and hearing impairments and ways of dealing with them.  

A very troubling aspect of Marjorie’s sight loss has been her visual hallucinations otherwise known as Charles Bonnet Syndrome. These hallucinations are a very common side effect of sight loss and for those who are affected they can be extremely frightening. Once the condition is explained it can bring great relief and peace of mind to the sufferer. Marjorie said that ‘I now know that I wasn’t going mad or dreaming when I saw donkeys walking down my street’.

Harry and his gadgets

Harry is visited at home by our South Lakes Support Officer and likes his gadgets. He has a Liquid Level Indicator for making drinks which beeps when the mug is full, a talking clock and a talking microwave. He has help with paperwork and a Blue Badge for going out in the car.      

He says “the service is more than satisfactory and has helped us both so much”.

Harry has adapted to living with Macular Degeneration and he and his wife Audrey are out and about most days.

They both attend our social support group and have made friends with other people experiencing sight loss.

Harry is visited at home by our South Lakes Support Officer and likes his gadgets. He has a Liquid Level Indicator for making drinks which beeps when the mug is full, a talking clock and a talking microwave. He has help with paperwork and a Blue Badge for going out in the car.      

He says “the service is more than satisfactory and has helped us both so much”.